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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 13  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 84-88

Surgical management of pediatric eye injuries


1 Department of Surgery, College of Medicine and Health Sciences; Department of Ophthalmology, Al-Ain Hospital, United Arab Emirates University, Al-Ain, United Arab Emirates
2 Department of Ophthalmology, Al-Ain Hospital, United Arab Emirates University, Al-Ain, United Arab Emirates
3 Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Medicine, University of Sharjah, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates
4 Department of Surgery, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, United Arab Emirates University, Al-Ain, United Arab Emirates

Correspondence Address:
Tahra AlMahmoud
Department of Surgery, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, United Arab Emirates University
United Arab Emirates
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ojo.OJO_285_2019

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BACKGROUND: Eye injury is a leading cause of unilateral childhood blindness. The purpose of this research was to study the management and visual outcome of pediatric eye injuries necessitating hospitalization and surgical repair. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This is a retrospective study of children having eye injury that needed surgical repair over the period of 2012 and 2017. Demographic data, place of occurrence, activity at the time of injury, place and cause of injury, presenting signs, surgical interventions, visual acuity (VA) before and after surgery, and causes for vision limitations were studied. RESULTS: Thirty-nine eyes of children were surgically treated. The mean (range) age of the patients was 3 years (1–15 years). Nearly 61.5% were males. Almost 80% of injuries occurred at home and while playing (71.8%). Trauma with sharp objects (35.8%) was the most common cause of injury. Majority presented to the hospital in <6 h (89%), mainly with eye pain (95%). Corneal laceration (53.8%), traumatic cataract (15.3%), and foreign body (15.3%) were the most common clinical findings. Twenty-one (53.8%) eyes sustained open-globe injuries. Fifteen percent had vision of 20/200 or worse at follow-up. The VA improved significantly at follow-up (P < 0.05). The major cause of vision limitation was the cornea (33%). CONCLUSIONS: Eye injury is a major cause of vision loss in children. Despite early presentation to our hospital and prompt interventions, significant number of our pediatric patients sustained limited VA in ruptured globe injuries.


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