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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2017  |  Volume : 10  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 193-197

Emergency visits after corneal transplantation in Yemen


1 Department of Ophthalmology, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Sana'a University, Sana'a; Department of Ophthalmology, Cornea and Refractive Surgery Unit, Magrabi Eye Hospital, Sana'a, Republic of Yemen
2 Department of Ophthalmology, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Sana'a University, Sana'a, Republic of Yemen
3 Department of Ophthalmology, Cornea and Refractive Surgery Unit, Magrabi Eye Hospital, Sana'a, Republic of Yemen

Correspondence Address:
Mahfouth Abdalla Bamashmus
Department of Ophthalmology, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Sana'a University, P. O. Box: 19576, Sana'a
Republic of Yemen
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ojo.OJO_217_2016

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PURPOSE: Awareness of symptoms and signs of possible complications after corneal transplantation is very important. Early presentation can enhance long-term survival of the cornea. This study evaluates the reasons for emergency presentation and management of postcorneal transplantation complications. PATIENTS AND METHODS: This retrospective study included a total of 134 postkeratoplasty patients at the cornea unit in Yemen Magrabi Eye Hospital in Sana'a between 2008 and 2010. RESULTS: The most common indication for keratoplasty was keratoconus in 103 patients (76.9%) followed by bullous keratopathy (4.5%) and corneal dystrophy (4.5%). 80 (59.7%) patients presented for emergency visits. Pain and foreign body sensation were the main presenting symptoms. Loose irritating sutures (29.9%) and graft rejection (10.4%) were the most common diagnoses. Twelve patients (8.9%) were admitted to the hospital for re-suturing. CONCLUSION: Proper postoperative care is critical for a successful keratoplasty; early intervention of sight-threatening complications increases the chance of graft survival and best-obtained vision. In our corneal transplantation service, all patients are routinely instructed to arrange a same day emergency visit if they experience any symptom in eyes that have undergone keratoplasty.


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