About OJO | Search | Ahead of print | Current Issue | Archives | Author Instructions | Reviewer Guidelines | Online submissionLogin 
Oman Journal of Ophthalmology Oman Journal of Ophthalmology
  Editorial Board | Subscribe | Advertise | Contact
https://www.omanophthalmicsociety.org/ Users Online: 250  Wide layoutNarrow layoutFull screen layout Home Print this page  Email this page Small font size Default font size Increase font size
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2011  |  Volume : 4  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 17-20

Ocular status and functional adaptation of visually challenged children of a special school in Oman


1 Eye and Ear Health Care, Department of Non-communicable Disease Control, Ministry of Health, Muscat, Oman
2 Department of Ophthalmology, Al Nahdhah Hospital, Muscat, Oman
3 Omar bin Qatab School for Visually challenged, Oman

Correspondence Address:
Rajiv Khandekar
Eye and Ear Health Care, Department of Non-communicable Disease Control, Director General of Health Affairs, Ministry of Health (HQ) POB: 393, Pin: 113, Muscat
Oman
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0974-620X.77657

Rights and Permissions

Introduction : We assessed the ocular status and visual adaptation among children studying at a school for visually disabled children in Muscat, Oman. Materials and Methods : This descriptive study was conducted in 2009-2010. We assessed the visual and ocular status of the participants. They were interviewed to elicit the past history of eye problems and management. They also expressed their visual adaptation in their 'day-to-day' life, and their ambitions. Result : We examined and interviewed 47 participants (29 male and 18 female). The mean age of the participants was 19.7 years (Standard deviation 5.9 years). Twenty-six of them were blind since birth. Phthisical eyes, disfigured eyes and anophthalmic sockets were noted in 19, 58, and six eyes of participants. Twenty-six (55.5%) participants had visual disabilities due to genetic causes, since birth. In 13 participants, further investigations were needed to confirm diagnosis and determine further management After low vision training, 13 participants with residual vision could be integrated in the school with normal children. One participant was recommended stem cell treatment for visual restoration. Five children were advised reconstructive orbital surgery. The participants were not keen to use a white cane for mobility. Some participants, 16 / 28 (57%), with absolute blindness, were not able to read the Braille language. Singing and playing music were not very well-accepted hobbies among the participants. Nineteen participants were keen to become teachers. Conclusions : Children with visual disabilities need to be periodically assessed. The underlying causes of visual disabilities should be further explored to facilitate prevention and genetic counseling. Participants had visual adaptation for daily living and had ambitions for the future.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed3259    
    Printed161    
    Emailed1    
    PDF Downloaded378    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal